<html>
<head>
<style><!--
.hmmessage P
{
margin:0px;
padding:0px
}
body.hmmessage
{
font-size: 10pt;
font-family:Tahoma
}
--></style>
</head>
<body class='hmmessage'>


<style><!--
.hmmessage P
{
margin:0px;
padding:0px
}
body.hmmessage
{
font-size: 10pt;
font-family:Tahoma
}
--></style>


<style><!--
.hmmessage P
{
margin:0px;
padding:0px
}
body.hmmessage
{
font-size: 10pt;
font-family:Tahoma
}
--></style>
This came up on the IRC channel this weekend.<br><br>Currently, the encryption page of the PC-BSD Handbook suggests that one should not encrypt /usr as most of its contents are known and that could provide too much data for a cryptographic attack (this was the result of a suggestion by cpercival last year). Yet, the installer by default offers to encrypt /usr. Further, the default partitioning scheme does not make /home which is probably what users are interested in encrypting anyways.<br><br>It was suggested that:<br><br>1. the default partitioning scheme separates /usr and /home<br><br>2. the default encryption option offers to encrypt /home instead of /usr<br><br>One of the commenters on the IRC thread suggested that we also look into the ability to use the user's password salted with a randomly generated salt as a passphrase for the encrypted /home. This would relieve the user from entering a password to boot their system but keep things encrypted and secure. The commenter was not sure if the GELI framework would allow this though.<br><br>The salted part might be something to discuss with pjd@ at BSDCan?<br><br>Cheers,<br><br>Dru<br><br><br>                                     </body>
</html>