<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Tue, Jan 12, 2010 at 10:14 AM, Stephan Assmus <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:superstippi@gmx.de">superstippi@gmx.de</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
<br>
Yes, unlike &quot;Linux&quot;, FreeBSD is a complete operating system - if you<br>
consider text-based &quot;complete&quot; (I don&#39;t mean to imply anything here).<br>
<br>
Best regards,<br>
<font color="#888888">-Stephan<br>
</font><div><div></div><div class="h5">_______________________________________________<br>
Testing mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Testing@lists.pcbsd.org">Testing@lists.pcbsd.org</a><br>
<a href="http://lists.pcbsd.org/mailman/listinfo/testing" target="_blank">http://lists.pcbsd.org/mailman/listinfo/testing</a><br>
<br>
</div></div></blockquote></div><br>That&#39;s an interesting comment - why would an operating system need an integrated X11/Aqua/Windows style GUI? I think by and large, the majority of operating systems do not actually have an integrated GUI like that... in fact, Linux certainly doesn&#39;t (hence the ability to swap out X11/Xorg/etc) nor does OSX (since I can do much the same there). I think only a few like Menuet and Windows Vista onwards have this.<br>
<br>Not being critical, but it certainly is a very different way to look at an OS than I&#39;m used to (especially since I run typically almost entirely text only, using a GUI only for Firefox, Rhythmbox, RDC, and tons of terminal sessions really)<br>
<br clear="all"><br>-- <br>Thanks,<br>Mike Bybee<br>