In a discussion between Ian Robinson &amp; Brodey Dover about accessing the<br> system hard disk and other disks from within ports console,<br>Brodey Dover replied:<br><br>&gt;I&#39;m actually confused that you can get the system disk&#39;s /home since the<br>
&gt;script seems to mount a null device for /home! I can see what would need<br>&gt;to be done to get what you want but I also see why certain things were<br>&gt;done to setup the jail that way.<br>&gt;<br>&gt;Ian you could edit the /PCBSD/portjail/portjail.sh script yourself and<br>
&gt;have your drives mounted that way. I can see some opinions on how or<br>&gt;whether mounting all/any disk drives (other than boot) would be wanted<br>&gt;in the shell. I am of the opinion that it should be done because I can<br>
&gt;see some usages in the IT world.<br>&gt;<br>&gt;Brodey<br><br><br>First, thanks for the suggestion about editing the portjail script.  In the meantime, I sought instant gratification and broke the rules when I installed the Kaffeine port using the traditional method in a regular terminal.  The good news is nothing broken that I know of. <br>
<br>Following up on your excellent suggestion to modify the script, I looked it over.  I saw the /home directory is mounted in the script at this line:<br>mount_nullfs /usr/home ${PJDIR}/usr/home<br><br>and, upon closing the port console, is unmounted with this line:<br>
 umount ${PJDIR}/usr/home<br><br>Accordingly, one would have to insert lines into the shell script to mount and unmount the drive directories at the target mountpoints.<br><br>Another workaround might be working in the regular system to set new mountpoints under the users /home directory and then mount the drives on the new mountpoints.<br>
<br>I&#39;m guessing that the main reason Kris gave the jail access to the home directory is because one needs access to read and write data from the program that you are running in the ports console as well as read/write access by other programs that are not run through the ports console.  But if one needed to protect the data being accessed from corruption, the owner could set permissions to read access  only or could copy the data into the jail leaving the original otherwise inaccessible. <br>
<br>Anyway, Brodey, you have come up with an excellent suggestion.<br><br>Ian Robinson<br>Salem, Ohio<br>